Gloyn et al. (2003) performed a candidate gene association s

Gloyn et al. (2003) performed a candidate gene association study for type 2 diabetes. In particular,… Show more Gloyn et al. (2003) performed a candidate gene association study for type 2 diabetes. In particular, they examined the E23K SNP within the KCNJ11 gene. The table below shows the number of people with diabetes (cases) and number of people without diabetes (controls) having each of the three genotypes at this SNP: Genotype Count in Cases Count in Controls EE 308 491 EK 412 534 KK 134 157 (a) What is the frequency of the K allele in cases? In controls? (b) Based on these data, how much does a copy of the K allele increase your risk of type 2 diabetes? In other words, how many times more likely are you to have type 2 diabetes if you have the K allele vs. if you have an E allele? (c) If you were to perform an allelic test of association, you would find a P-value of 0.01. If this is the only SNP that you tested for association, would you reject the null hypothesis of no association (assume α= 0.05)? (d) Now imagine that this variant is one of 500,000 variants genotyped and tested for association with type 2 diabetes, and you observe an uncorrected P-value of 0.01 for this SNP. Would you now reject the null hypothesis of no association? Why might your answer be different from that in part c? Helpful equations: R is the response to selection S is the selection differential • Show less

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