Two membranes, A and B, have permeabilities PA and PB for a

Two membranes, A and B, have permeabilities PA and PB for a given solute. These two membranes are jo… Show more Two membranes, A and B, have permeabilities PA and PB for a given solute. These two membranes are joined together to form a single composite, two-layered membrane, as shown in Figure 2.PS2.1. (Examples are the successive filtration/ diffusion barriers in the kidney glomerulus, successive permeability barriers in the lung, and successive permeability barriers of unstirred layers adjacent to intestinal epithelial membranes. — A. How would you define the overall permeability P of the two-layered membrane? Hint: think about how you would define permeability for any membrane. Think about what you need to know to calculate P. Use CL for the left concentration and CR for the concentration on the right. — B. Why is the steady-state solute flux through the composite membrane the same through the membrane A layer and the membrane B layer? Hint: think of the continuity equation and what it means. — C. What is the concentration profile through the composite membrane? Hint: calculate the concentration at the interface of membranes A and B; call it Cm, in terms of CL and CR. Hint: equate the flux through the two membranes. — D. Find an expression for P in terms of PA and PB. • Show less

                                                                                                                                  Order Now

Place Order