Business Internet/Email Use Policies

Business Internet/Email Use Policies
Name
Institution

Business Internet/Email Use Policies
In an organization, some specific workers require mandatory access to the internet as it is necessary for the job tasks’ performance. The adoption of the internet must be controlled by the ability to think and make decisions. Internet usage policy outlines rules and guidelines for the employees on the acceptable use of network and internet access. The policy is an important document signed by all employees when they start working for the organization (Weidman and Grossklags, 2019). The policy should be tailored to the requirements of the specific organization.
The internet usage policy for organization QWE requires that all employees access computers and the internet to adhere to the usage policy in the performance of their work. The use of the internet by employees is allowed and encouraged if it works within its goals and objectives (Weidman and Grossklags, 2019). Unauthorized and illegal actions such as hacking, selling, and buying illegal goods are prohibited. Production of unauthorized copies of company files and data is prohibited. The usage policy prohibits gaming using organizations, computers, networks, and internet access (Weidman and Grossklags, 2019). Disciplinary and legal actions resulting from the violation of the computer, email, and internet usage policies and liability on damages caused by the policy’s violation.
For XYZ organization, the internet usage policy is lean on the employees. It allows the clients and employees to have personal internet access while the organization owns all rights to the files and data in any company-owned networks and computers. The policies in the two organizations are similar and different in a few aspects. For instance, computers, networks, and internet access to play games are prohibited for both organizations. As Weidman and Grossklags (2019) recommend, the email content that discriminates is prohibited, and the view of pornography content and stories via email would lead to immediate termination. For QWE organizations, the policies restrict the employees from using the internet for specifically job-related activities. Any actions on the internet besides the job tasks and authorized use is a violation of the policy. On the other hand, XYZ organization policies allow some actions besides the job tasks. Internet users can carry out their personal research within the authorized actions of the policy.
Monitoring of employee’s usage of computers and emails is normal. It ensures that business resources are not misused for personal gains and illegal actions (Campbell, Shropshire, & Stylianou, 2017). Legally, employers have a right to monitor how their employees use the available company resources. Monitoring of employees’ internet and email usage, therefore, creates an ethical question, focusing on how the employers can balance the employee’s expectation of privacy while ensuring that the employees are productive and do not engage in illegal behavior (Campbell, Shropshire, & Stylianou, 2017).
In my opinion, it is right for employers to monitor the use of resources when a notice of monitoring is communicated to the employees on internal policies. In my opinion, the business should monitor the employees to protect the company and the employees while giving adequate attention to the ethical treatment of the employees. In that manner, the organization creates an environment that achieved accountability and transparency for operating effectively. The desired state would have the employer make ethical considerations and only monitor selected employees when they believe they are engaging in undesirable conduct.

References
Campbell, M., Shropshire, J., & Stylianou, A. (2017). A stitch in time saves nine: the role of moral judgment in reducing internet policy violations. International Journal of Business Information Systems, 24(3), 369-386.
Weidman, Jake, and Grossklags, Jens, (2019). “THE ACCEPTABLE STATE: AN ANALYSIS OF THE CURRENT STATE OF ACCEPTABLE USE POLICIES IN ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS”. In Proceedings of the 27th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Stockholm & Uppsala, Sweden, June 8-14, 2019. ISBN 978-1-7336325-0-8 Research Papers.
https://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2019_rp/99